Archive for September, 2008

Web 2.0 Strategies for CIOs

September 30, 2008

Came across this blog post from Social Computing Magazine, “Ten Aspects of Web 2.0 Strategy That Every CTO and CIO Should Know’. He asks how to make the transition from 1.0 to 2.0 safely and non-disruptively with your business largely intact, perhaps even with a superior competitive position.”

My opinion has always been that Web 2.0 is disruptive, however, there may be strategies to minimize the disruption and win on competitive strategies. There is a helpful diagram about a transformation model.

Some of the 10 points are:

  • It’s not about technology, it’s about the changes it enables
  • Existing management methods and conventional wisdom are a hard barrier to 2.0 strategy and transformation
  • Incubators and pilot projects can help create initial environments for success with 2.0 efforts
  • The business side requires 2.0 competence as well.

Worth reading and implementing in  your organization, even healthcare.

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Pinterest
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Disruptive Women in Health Care

September 26, 2008

This new movement and blog is a great way to focus on the health care debate for women. Written by women who are leaders in health care, it already presents opinions and education on a variety of topics. Today’s post is by Missy Krasner of Google Health (opinions are her own and not her employer’s). She makes some good points – the underinsured are us, people are getting there information online and from non-experts, people are spending money to stay young and beautiful (and hopefully well). She concludes, “healthcare reform enthusiasts should take a hard look at what consumers are already doing today.”

I think she is on point – healthcare reform should not look back but look forward and finally begin to address the problems of the uninsured, underinsured as they exist today.

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Pinterest
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Credibility of Health Information and Digital Media

September 24, 2008

This extensive chapter authored by Gunther Eysenbach appears in a new book titled Digital Media, Youth, and Credibility. He begins by making the case for quality health information, “educating consumers and providers of health information and services about how to avoid “low quality” information becomes paramount.” And then goes on to question internet users’ claims of verifying the reliability of health information. In relationship to youth, he points out that, “Part of the trouble in discerning trustworthy sites from dubious ones is the result of a deficit of context. ”
In relationship to adolescence and health seeking behavior, he uses his newly defined term apomediation, “While personality traits and developmental factors may broadly predispose individuals to generally prefer one approach over the other, the decision to use apomediaries versus intermediaries remains largely dynamic and situational.”
He goes on to discuss the challenges and limitations of this new concept. “people using an apomediary approach
to credibility assessment are probably more prone to employ a “spectral evaluation” rather than a “binary evaluation” approach, acknowledging “shades of grey” rather than “black and white” answers.” In Applying Network Theory to Apomediaries, we encounter another new term: Credibility Hubs. And are encouraged to example source and message creditability. One of the conclusions is that health information websites for children and adolescents need to have street credibility rather than traditional credibility like government websites might have.

This comprehensive work is worth not only reading but studying.

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Pinterest
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

The Intelligent Cloud – Implications for Health and Medicine

September 19, 2008

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.”

This phrase describes the future of cloud computing and more specifically, information storage and retrieval.
Predictions from Google:

  • By 2019, parallel-processing computer clusters will be 50 to 100 times more powerful
  • we’ll also see a rush of new devices customized to particular applications, and more environmental sensors and actuators, all sending and receiving data via the cloud.
  • computer systems will have greater opportunity to learn from the collective behavior of billions of humans
  • Researchers across medical and scientific fields can access massive data sets and run analysis and pattern detection algorithms that aren’t possible today.

There are likely other implications for health care, such as, accessing the the cloud (or a secure area of it) to see your medical records or X-rays anywhere and on any device (Google map of your body and DNA?), ability to get answers to complex medical problems from anywhere, intelligent prescriptions with a map to the closest pharmacy or dispensing station of the future. Other ideas?  Need a cloud computing for medicine think tank.

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Pinterest
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Project Health Design Conference video available

September 19, 2008

“Design Teams Unveil Innovative PHR Applications that Help People Take Charge of Their Health. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-sponsored project demonstrates how a new vision for personal health records can transform the way people engage in health care.”

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Pinterest
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Esther Dyson interview about The Digital Health Revolution

September 19, 2008

In an interview from Scribemedia.org, Esther Dyson discusses the problems with the health care system and the limitations of Health 2.0.  She sees Health 2.0 as emphasizing the problems in the system rather than solving them. She promotes the idea of changing financial incentives to promote outcomes.  She discusses the importance of transparency in health care including more specific data about physicians to assist in selection of providers and hospitals. Outcome data needs to be presented in a way that is understandable to the consumer.

“I want people to understand stuff”, she says in reference to her interest in genetics through her investment and involvement in 23 and Me and other ventures.

Another quote: “Intelligence is like the semantic web.”

Worth the 35 minutes of your time.

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Pinterest
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Cheaper Genes

September 18, 2008

23 and Me, the genetic testing company, announced a price drop for scanning your genome to $399, from $999. Will that mean more business? Will it cut into the competition? Or does it mean the company is in trouble. It is best known as a Google spin off and now stands on its own. Unlike many Health 2.0 companies, it actually sells a product but also has some cool technology on its website  including an opportunity to participate in research.

Certainly is a company and a trend to watch.

Will Google Health provide a way to store your genetic information in the cloud?

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Pinterest
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Next-Generation PHRs

September 17, 2008

The Fall is certainly the season for conferences. Besides the Health 2.0 conference in San Francisco, there will be a conference sponsored by Project Health Design on this topic which begins tomorrow, Sept. 17th in Washington, DC. Some major players will present their models including representatives from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Johnson & Johnson and the eHealth Initiative.

One quote from the program: “Project HealthDesign teams demonstrate that their applications can link PHRs with a range of technologies people use every day – cell phones, digital assistants and others. People will use new ways to interact with technologies – speech, gestures and even device-to-device connections.” Exciting stuff.

I hope that proceedings, audio or video will be available in the near future since I will not be able to attend either conference this year.

Share this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter