Posts Tagged ‘SocialMedia’

Two Book Chapters Published

March 3, 2014

 

Social Media

Last week I had two book chapters published.

First, a new social media book published by HIMSS titled Applying Social Media Technologies in Healthcare Environments edited by  Christina Thielst, an early adopter of blogging in Health IT. My chapter is on “Social Media Hubs: Strategy and Implementation.” The book addresses a wide range of issues including legal and public health.

 

 

Health Informatics

The second chapter is an update to Health Informatics: Practical Guide for Healthcare and Information Technology Professionals now in its 6th edition. My chapter is on eResearch, reviewing how information technology can support all aspects of the research workflow. The book is expanded adding several new chapters and is now endorsed by AMIA and available to AMIA members at a discount. Bob Hoyt, the editor from the University of West Florida, has created a companion website as a resource to informatics faculty and students called www.informaticseducation.org.

Both books are available in paper and as ebooks.

Another book chapter is nearing publishing. Will have an announcement about that soon.

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Year in Review – SlideShare and Delicious

January 15, 2014

Two automated reports I came across thanks to the Twitterati.

First is SlideShare personalized year in review shows a definite peak in November after I uploaded two presentations I made in Houston on Social Media Intro and Social Media in Healthcare. My total views on SlideShare are approaching 100,000 with over 20,000 in 2013 alone. And it  is not only my most recent uploads which draw the traffic, some over five years old also draw ongoing interest and have 7000 views. Slideshare has been a source of speaking invitations as well.

Delicious has a similar reporting method. The Delicious Annual Report reminds me I joined in 2007 and has a nice constellation view of some of the content. It includes a word cloud, top finds and popular links. However, in starting my new job, I have decided to transition to Evernote in which I can save hyperlinks but also notes and other content.

Research Gate shows 329 publication views for 2013 with a Research Gate score of 11.33.

For Twitter, I found Simply Measured, should showed not only that I have 6380 followers but also my Klout score of 61.6 and 10,706 total tweets (not for last year only). Also displayed are key words (health care, top), audience distribution, audience by time zone,

 

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2013 Year in Review

December 31, 2013

It’s been another year of achievement and learning. It would have been difficult a year ago to predict how my professional life would change.

My first trip mixed pleasure and work. Being in Salt Lake City, I agreed to speak to the Utah Center for Clinical and Translational Science on some of my work at the Cleveland Clinic and the Cleveland Clinical and Translational Science Consortium. Bernie LaSalle made the event into a series of presentations by the University of Utah Bioinformatics team which was very informative.

Next it was off to the American Medical Informatics Association Joint Summits in San Francisco in March. Presented two posters:

 

 

 

In May and June, I taught my first online course for the Health Informatics program at Kent State University in Clinical Analytics. Earlier in the year I designed the course and had an experienced group of students who were eager to learn this emerging area of informatics.

Related to Clinical Analytics, I participated in the Clinical and Business Intelligence Data and Analytics Task force of HIMSS,  wrote a blog post on Teaching Clinical Analytics and then did a virtual event for HIMSS in September on “Transforming Care by Improved Decision Making: Deriving Meaning from Big Data.” Presentation is here.

September brought the Midwest Hospital Cloud Forum in Chicago where I presented on a panel: Closing the Loop in Healthcare Analytics – Correlating Clinical and Administrative Systems with Research Efforts to Deliver Clinical Efficiency in Real Time.

In early November, I was in Houston as the keynote speaker for the Texas Gulf Coast Association for Healthcare Quality. I gave two presentations:

I was surprised and please that my Slide Share stats continued to show growth to over 98,000 views including some growth from presentations of 5 years ago. Twitter followers also grew to over 6,000.
The big change of the year was leaving Cleveland Clinic after 32 years. I found a new job posted on Twitter by Mary Griskewicz from HIMSS for Senior Manager, Consumer Health IT, a kind of dream job to focus on consumer/patient IT. As luck would have it, HIMSS had just openned the HIMSS Innovation Center at the Global Center for Health Innovation in downtown Cleveland with an office available for me. Even got to meet the president and some of the VPs of HIMSS at the Cleveland Clinic Innovation Summit in October at the Innovation Center. I blogged about joining HIMSS – “Why I came to HIMSS – the opportunity for the connected patient.”
Since joining HIMSS, I have traveled to the Arlington office and to the mHealth Summit in DC. Great meeting on Mobile Health from the the Venture Summit, to the Danish Health Minister to Esther Dyson and other thought leaders on topics like disruption, global health and business models.
Finally, I have three book chapters in the pipeline:
  • Revision on my chapter on eResearch for Health Informatics
  • Chapter on Computing and Information in Wireless Health
  • Chapter on Social Media Hubs for a new book on Social Media in Healthcare published by HIMSS (to be available at the HIMSS conference in February)

 

What will 2014 bring? Certainly opportunities to enhance national collaboration on consumer health issues especially at the HIMSS14 conference where I will be managing the Connected Patient Learning Gallery. In many ways, patient engagement and the connected patient are no longer concepts but are at the tipping point of real change. Things will look very different a year from now and I plan to play a part in it.

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Social Media in Healthcare Quality

November 1, 2013

Today I presented at the Texas Gulf Coast Association for Healthcare Quality on social media in healthcare. Slides are posted on my Slideshare. The video, Empathy: The Human Connection to Patient Care is below

Quality professionals in healthcare including risk management and patient safety are relatively new to social media. They have some realistic concerns about HIPAA and sharing proprietary information on safety issues.  However, they are receptive to learning and sharing best practices. But where to start?

I think there is real potential for healthcare quality professionals to share best practices on social media and begin to develop communities around issues like patient safety, risk management, and patient satisfaction.

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Healthcare IT professionals you should follow on Twitter

June 4, 2013

There are actually many people to follow in this category but I was privileged to be first on this list by MedCityNews last week. Also, it put me in some good company, most of whom I already follow, such as, @jhalamka and the infamous @histalk.

This made me think of writing a brief post about how I use Twitter. I was an early adopter of Twitter starting just before attending Medicine 2.0 in Toronto in 2007. Meeting an energetic group from the US and Europe who were live tweeting at the conference got me hooked.

Now I have 5500 followers from Europe to Australia and follow about 1100.  I post 3-6 times per day and more often at conferences.  My focus in tweeting is health IT, health care social media, mHealth and apps, innovation in healthcare, conferences I attend, articles I read (newsletters and journals) and some notable Cleveland Clinic news.  I try to share quality information and almost always include links. I use my favorite hash tags #hcsm, #mhealth, #HIMSS, #EMR. Have not gotten into the habit of using #HealthIT or #HITsm yet.

I also promote some of my favorite people, such as, @berci, @healthythinker, @lucienengelen, @nicolaziady, @ReginaHolliday,@ahier and many others.

Overall, I try to provide quality information that I think is important and not get bogged down in criticizing others or off-color remarks.

I hope I can continue to earn the respect of the wild world of Twitterland. See you there.

 

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Virtual Presentation in Bilbao, Spain at Salud 2.0

July 9, 2012

Salud 2.0 is simply Health 2.0 in Spanish. This conference brings together speakers to discuss Web 2.0 technologies in health care. My presentation was Social Media in Health Care: A Reasoned Approach.

I received several questions and will repeat them here to give more complete answers:

  1. What to you mean about the risk of conflict of interest?
    Because social media is largely brief communication, a physician or other healthcare professional could promote a product or service without a disclaimer that they have a financial interest in this product. To be transparent about potential conflicts of interest in social media, one must add a link to a webpage with full disclosure. Drug and device companies must be clear about any claims they make on social media and should link to more complete information.
  2. There are so many social media outlets, how do you choose where to start?
    Find the best tool for what you need. It is not necessary to use multiple social media tools. For instance, if you are a physician or healthcare professional and want to communicate with colleagues, use Twitter if you are comfortable with more open communications, use a private social network for your group only if you would rather keep private. If you are a hospital and want to interact with patients, consider Facebook because it is an open, widely used platform which allows comments from patients.
  3. In Spain there is a publicly supported healthcare system, unlike the US. How should the approach to social media be different?
    I would think hospitals would still want to hear from patients but would not use social media as a means to attract new patients unless there was a specialty service that more patients should be made aware of. A good example of this is http://www.guiametabolica.org/ which is also being presented at the conference.  Social media could also have more of a public health approach – how to keep the population healthier and identify diseases earlier for intervention.

Here are the slides from the presentation. And the video is below:

 

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Eleven Chronic Disease Technologies to Watch

June 28, 2012

This significant report by NEHI (New England Health Policy Institute) reviews current tech trends which will impact the future of chronic disease management. The report categorizes these technologies into 4 classes based on the significant evidence supporting clinical and financial benefits. The technologies reviewed are:

  • Extended Care eVisits
  • Home Telehealth
  • In-Car Telehealth
  • Medication Adherence Tools
  • Mobile Asthma Management Tools
  • Mobile Cardiovascular Tools
  • Mobile Clinical Decision Support
  • Mobile Diabetes Management Tools
  • Social Media Promoting Health
  • Tele-Stroke Care
  • Virtual Visits

Social media for promoting health was put in class IV. They note that some “their goal is to give simple daily challenges or “micro-actions” that add up to significant health improvements over time.”  They report that their is a lack of evidence of effectiveness because they are so new and reports of success are mostly anecdotal by the vendors themselves. The exception are some studies of smoking cessation. While there may be a limited number of randomized clinical trials in the use of social media, there is a growing evidence of the effectiveness of social media in healthcare. Also, social media in healthcare is much broader than promoting health.  Online communities, apps, and Twitter are powerful tools capable of having a significant impact on managing and coping with illness. Also, increasing evidence is being published weekly in journals like Journal of Medical Internet Research and the Journal of Participatory Medicine.

Conclusion: this report has excellent analysis on several underutilized technologies in medicine but the evidence for the effectiveness of social media is stronger in my opinion.

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A Look at Social Media in Health Care — Two Years Later – iHealthbeat post

May 21, 2012

Last week I had a follow up post on iHealthbeat on Social Media in Healthcare to one that I posted two years ago. Some of my predictions were correct but who could predict the explosion of healthcare apps.  There were so many other trends I could have cited including the study of healthcare social media in European hospitals.

Coincidentally, I attended the Cleveland Clinic Patient Experience Empathy and Innovation Summit on Sunday.  One track in the afternoon was devoted to social media with a good mix of speakers covering the latest trends in healthcare and beyond. Check out the Twitter stream here.

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Thoughts on Sentiment Analysis in Health Care

March 6, 2012

There is increasing interest in Sentiment Analysis of social media. The brief messaging systems like Twitter and Facebook allow for picking out words and phrases using algorithms to find positive or negative sentiment. There are an increasing number of tools to do sentiment analysis and market research firms willing to do it. Using a simple tool like TwitterSentiment can get quick results but are they meaningful for healthcare? For instance, looking at “Mayo Clinic”, the results are rated as negative but examining the tweets show a mix of statements and some rated negative (78%) have to do with waiting for someone in surgery or concern about illness rather than care or quality. But using their twitter handle @MayoClinic shows 90% positive. Similar results are seen with Cleveland Clinic and Hopkins Medicine. Perhaps tools with a license fee are more sophisticated and show clearer results. An market research firms may take more time to tweet algorithms to sort out positives and negatives.

But hospital reputation is not the only use of sentiment analysis in health care social media. What are sentiments about diseases and conditions? In a brief check, cancer was more positive than cancer. But some comments are mixed, “thanks love! My roommate got diagnosed with cancer” is rated positive. My conclusion, sentiment analysis in healthcare requires fine tuning – what is good news, what is bad, what is neutral? The temporary pain of treatment can be a real downer but the results a real high. I will be interested to see more written on this in the future. Some research has begun, such as, this article on cancer survivorship.

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What am I working on? Check my Bookmarks

January 7, 2012

DeliciousI am glad that Delicious is still around and being enhanced. I have used it for years to organize and tag my bookmarks. Now with almost 1200 bookmarks and several hundred tags, I often search my links to find a resource for a presentation or article. Recent links include:

So while links may be low on the priority list in social media with many more dynamic and “sexy” like Twitter and Facebook, Delicious has its place and does allow followers, RSS feeds and other social media features.
So if you are interested in what I am working on, my Delicious  may give you a clue.
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