Posts Tagged ‘Cloud Computing’

Web 2.0 Magazine

March 19, 2009

Came across a new online magazine and toolbox – the Web 2.0 Magazine. Lots of blog postings on a variety of topics but lacking dates. Its toolbox includes a small catalog of web 2.0 tools and hopefully will grow with tools and reviews. Industry events includes several related to cloud computing, such as Private Clouds.

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Building 100% in the Cloud

November 5, 2008

A new Web 2.0 company, Drop.io, has its infrastructure virtually through Amazon making it totally dependent on the Cloud for hosting. Are there pros and cons to this? They see mostly pros – highly available, meet unpredictable growth needs, limit startup expenses, treat storage like the commodity it is. They like the variable cost as a start up as opposed to fixed costs. Maybe there is a lesson for Health 2.0 startups here.

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The Intelligent Cloud – Implications for Health and Medicine

September 19, 2008

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.”

This phrase describes the future of cloud computing and more specifically, information storage and retrieval.
Predictions from Google:

  • By 2019, parallel-processing computer clusters will be 50 to 100 times more powerful
  • we’ll also see a rush of new devices customized to particular applications, and more environmental sensors and actuators, all sending and receiving data via the cloud.
  • computer systems will have greater opportunity to learn from the collective behavior of billions of humans
  • Researchers across medical and scientific fields can access massive data sets and run analysis and pattern detection algorithms that aren’t possible today.

There are likely other implications for health care, such as, accessing the the cloud (or a secure area of it) to see your medical records or X-rays anywhere and on any device (Google map of your body and DNA?), ability to get answers to complex medical problems from anywhere, intelligent prescriptions with a map to the closest pharmacy or dispensing station of the future. Other ideas?  Need a cloud computing for medicine think tank.

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Cloud Computing – is Availability Meaningless?

September 16, 2008

In thinking about the advantages of cloud computing – the growing number of data sources which can be mashed up into new applications, one must consider availability of these services. This article poses the question of whether the traditional measures of availability, five 9′s, is outmoded. If the primary data sources like Google maps and others have significant reliability, do the applications themselves have reliable hosting and application stability to provide this kind of availability?

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Personal Cloud

September 12, 2008

This post on the concept of a personal cloud focuses on the integration of the iPhone, Google tools and the cloud. How about a personal cloud for managing health? In his presentation on Google Health at HIMSS in February, Eric Schmidt envisioned storing health information, including all the xrays taken this year in the  Cloud so that they would be accessible from anywhere. Interesting concept.

First, Google Health should be available via the iPhone. Next, the clound should allow connection to your data and health information and tools from anywhere and on any device.

Finally, the personal cloud must be secure.

Also mentioned is an Mac program called Getting Things Done. Check out the  Wikipedia entry.

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The Petabyte Age

June 24, 2008

The latest issue of Wired magazine includes a series of articles lead by the editor Chris Anderson’s article, “The End of Theory: The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete.” In Wired‘s usually controversial approach to topics, he leads off with the quote, “All models are wrong, but some are useful.” In the petabyte age, we move from local storage to storage in the cloud and “information is not a matter of simple three- and four-dimensional taxonomy and order but of dimensionally agnostic statistics.”

He cites one medical example, he cites Craig Vetner who “went from sequencing individual organisms to sequencing entire ecosystems.” He proposes that “We can analyze the data without hypotheses about what it might show.”

Do these rash statements have relevance to health care? Much of health care information of interest to researchers are in secure databases such as EMRs. However, these are moving to the Cloud via RHIOs and initiatives like Google Health. Some research centers have placed data online and invited others to analyze. I think that there are huge amounts of data in health care that will come available for researchers in the next few years but it may not replace traditional randomized clinical trials.

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Cloud Computing – Many definitions

March 21, 2008

In this post, titled “Cloud Computing: Watch Out IT, It’s Raining Jargon“, the author explores the range of definitions depending on who’s talking – Google, Amazon or others.

But generally, the cloud is out there an growing.

Eric Schmidt referred to the cloud in his announcement about Google Health – storing his xrays in the cloud – let’s hope its a secure one.

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