Posts Tagged ‘Google’

Two More Articles on the Health 2.0 Conference

November 5, 2008

Neil Versel has written two articles from the conference which emphasize the optimistic outlook for Health 2.0 products.

The first quotes Robert Kolodner saying that Health 2.0 is in the early hype cycle. He also cited Enoch Choi of MedHelp who said that half of the panel last year on physician social networks are out of business but that the future is still bright, perhaps because the conference attracted 1000 attendees including many from mainline healthcare organizations and employers.

The second article is about Google Health and quotes Roni Zeiger who said that user feedback, much of which was from the pilot with the Cleveland Clinic, reflects enthusiasm for the product and the desire for more features. In discussing medication history, he said “Right now, Google Health’s role is “helping to build the pipes” for interoperable data exchange.” See also the recent announcement about Google Health’s deal with PatientAssistance.com to enable prescription assistance services from its PHR.

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Google Health Updates

October 16, 2008

Google Health has added some usability to make it accessible to the blind by enabling text readers. This will not only benefit those using Google Health but also those who pull their data from PHRs which don’t have these features.

Also, there is a new posting on ReadWriteWeb on Google Health and Microsoft Health Vault as Coke and Pepsi flavors of PHR platforms. Microsoft states, “introducing a new type of consumer health solution is a long-term endeavor.”
“This whole space is still so small, and has such huge potential, that we can both grow huge and succeed without bumping heads. Later on, head-to-head competition will probably be more important.” These platforms are very new but quickly growing their partner networks. It is difficult to see advantages yet so recommendations to consumers at this point are tough.

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Google Health – Interview with Missy Krasner

October 2, 2008

In a podcast interview for Modern Healthcare, Missy Krasner discusses Google Health including the early partnership with Cleveland Clinic and others. She emphasizes the value proposition of portability of healthcare information through Google Health. Slow adoption of PHRs she attributes to lack of interoperability and patients/consumers not being at the center of health care provision. Part of Google’s goal by opening up their API is to encourage innovation among small companies to add value. Also, by adding it to Google’s suite of products like email and calendaring, the hope is that Google Health will become part of one’s daily workflow.

My question is: how will we see this happen? Is anyone measuring this, researching adoption, promoting integration. I hope we will begin to see more reports of this in the press and professional Health IT journals. Or how about an offical Google blog just for Google Health?

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Google Launches Knol – Authoritative Knowledge

July 25, 2008

On the official Google Blog, some of the reasons for the development of Knol are explained. It looks like an opportunity to have vetted content which has a name of an authority on the topic assigned to it. This is different than a lot of the anonymous content on the web, and a different approach than Wikipedia which uses many authors who compete for defining topics. However, the tool does allow for “moderated collaboration”, meaning that someone can suggest a change to a Knol which the author(s) may accept or reject.

Many of the articles are on health care. At first, it appeared that many authors were from the San Francisco area but on further investigation, there were some from other parts of the country.

How will this fit into Google Search? Or Google Health? I think it has some real possibilities here.

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Top Web Programmer Receives His Due in Time Magazine

June 12, 2008

It is not often that the guys and gals working behind the scenes doing the hard core programming on PHRs and other healthcare applications get their due. This time Bob Lemon, my friend and long time programmer at the Cleveland Clinic gets first paragraph mention in an article in Time Magazine titled, “Medical Mouse Practice.”  Bob is responsible for much of the custom programming behind the eCleveland Clinic websites including MyChart. The article on EHRs talks about the 700 people like Bob who support the infrastructure which makes the EHR, PHR and ehealth tools possible. Bob also can take credit for the Google Walk For Good gadget.

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Google Health and More

May 20, 2008

Today in a webcast from the Googleplex, Google Health was opened to the public. All the features are now available to the U.S. at least. I participated in the pilot for the Cleveland Clinic as a participant in MyChart and found it easy to use, to import information and add more specifics. Now I can import my Google Health profile back into MyChart. Pretty cool. Also added the Walk for Good widget to my iGoogle home page. 100 users have signed up already.

This has already hit the tech and mainstream news outlets already with discussions about privacy, questions about Google’s motivation and benefits for consumers.

I think Google is adding some value here. There are making an effort to protect privacy while promoting health. And their partnerships indicate a desire to make this a broad umbrella for addressing health care issues.

I encourage you to try Google Health before making a quick judgement.

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Inside the Black Box: Technological Innovation at Google

March 17, 2008

A presentation by Jonathan Rosenberg, SVP of Product Management at Google, Inc. at Claremont McKenna College begins to open the black box of how Google thinks. He brings in concepts from Wikinomics and The Long Tail in addition to other sources to illustrate his points. Here are some of them.

  • work in small teams of 3 – avoid work from home
  • Argue everything with data, don’t present a new product by saying “I think” or using external data
  • don’t write a product plan – just do it, try it out
  • Think big -created a process to underachieve on very big goals but reward workers for them
  • understand the technology base case – Moore’s Law, Kreider’s law of storage
  • focus on the customer
  • Accept a small piece of the pie

My question is how can these be translated to other companies and especially health care? Maybe start small in development environments as entrepreneurial opportunities.

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Google Health Presented at HIMSS

February 29, 2008

Eric Schmidt and Roni Zeiger presented Google Health at a keynote session at HIMSS in Orlando this morning.
Key points included:

  • it’s the consumer’s data, the user has control
  • it needs to have ease of use – the user interface must be immediately useful
  • the benefit of consumer interoperability is significant
  • cloud computing will allow the storage of medical records including large files like images, “easy” to accomplish for Google (200 petabytes of xrays per year not a problem)
  • adoption of new consumer products are typically 5% the first year but 80-90% in 10 years
  • developers are invited to create new tools around the platform of Google Health. How about child immunization records, managing the health information and medication for your elderly parent in another state.

With this kind of optimism, could adoption exceed expectations?

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Google Health Partnership with the Cleveland Clinic

February 22, 2008

In a joint announcement today, Google and the Cleveland Clinic have launched what is being called a pilot program with the Clinic’s MyChart PHR users to connect to Google Health. On the Official Google Blog, some of the technical aspects are noted such as the GData protocol and the AuthSub interface to create what is being called a Continuity of Care Record. On the Cleveland Clinic side, it is seen as a way to push the national dialogue on electronic medical records and support national access, consumer empowerment and 24/7 accessibility/portability. The pilot will be offered on an invitation only basis to 10,000 MyChart users, a good start. Looking forward to seeing this expand in the next few months.

he bottom line issue is will consumers trust Google to store their medical records? My guess is the there is a 50/50 split on this – those who think it is adequately secure and those who are suspicious or fearful.

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Insights into working at Google

February 18, 2008

Written by a Google employee, this blog post give an unusual insight into some insights about working there. And its not just the gourmet food. It includes things like microefficiencies, the scale of your impact, brilliant coworkers, empowerment and working for a green, caring company. All this after only 11 months at the company. In many ways Google has been a model for other software development companies and departments within companies. How much of their culture can be mimicked? Not all for sure. But certainly some of these aspects can benefit any firm or development group.

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