Posts Tagged ‘Web 2.0’

The Experience of being an embedded Twitterer at a conference

October 22, 2009

Two weeks ago I was at the Cleveland Clinic Innovation Summit as an embedded tweet. As an experiment to promote the conference and encourage twittering, I was asked to actively tweet at this important conference which included many CEOs from drug and device firms. Here are some of my experiences.
A hash tag was decided a few weeks in advance: #CCInnovation.
Initially, keeping up with presentations which included slides was manageable. Abbreviating key quotes from leaders in medical innovation is a challenge and including links to their companies required some quick searches. When the program shifted to an interview style with a panel, it became more difficult to keep up with what was being said and who said it, much less adding a link. Some followers asked for who was saying what. Including a hash tag, who is speaking, what they said and potentially a link is a trick in 140 characters.
Some of the important followers were from the press. It’s not clear how many conference registrants actually participated or followed the twitter stream.
Technical challenges: at times the wireless was not available. At one point I switched to Tiny Twitter on my Blackberry.
Overall, it helped to know the conference content being familiar with clinical trials and the pharma and device industries.

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Hype Cycle for Web 2.0

August 19, 2009

Gartner Research has produced its latest white paper on their hype cycle for Web 2.0 technologies. The technology is moving beyond hype into maturity and real value, even transformational. Specifically they note: “we see a number of potentially transformational technologies that will hit the
mainstream in less than five years, including Web 2.0, cloud computing, Internet
TV, virtual worlds and service-oriented architecture (SOA).”
Surprisingly, they see Twitter  and Microblogging have peaked in the hype and will move toward some disillusionment.  ReadWriteWeb is of the opinion that “Gartner may be underestimating the impact of microblogging.”
They note on cloud computing that the hype from vendors has increased (“Deafening”) which may “cloud” the real potential benefit of this transformation. Social Software Suites are also mentioned: “The movement from point tools to integrated suites has brought broader adoption
but also high expectations” which could lead to disillusionment. I wonder if Google Wave will meet or disappoint these expectations.
Health 2.0 is not mentioned. Will Gartner produce a hype cycle for Health 2.0?

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In Defense of Writers

June 30, 2009

In the New Yorker this week, there is a review of Chris Anderson’s new book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price”.  Anderson who is known for saying “information wants to be free” continues that theme in seeing all content, music, writing, etc. will be driven by economic forces to be free. He is reinforcing the death of newspapers and their need to find a new business model even if there is none to be had. His argument that the reduction in the cost of transistors and other technology allow for a great business opportunity to offer things for free.

While much of the Internet is free, especially content served up from newspapers to health care organizations, his proposal implying that all content should be free, devalues writers, whether medical writers, news reporters and editors and others. Granted the nature of intellectual property has changed in the Web 2.0 world but not so much as to obliterate the value of good writing and ideas. There is room today and in the future for this IP to be valued and paid for. While micropayments never took off on the web, let’s hope that some newspapers survive and find additional business models to stay alive.

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The Future of Web 2.0

June 26, 2009

A post by Tim O’Reilly and John Battelle from the Web 2.0 Summit predicts extension of many of the existing tools to a more pervasive and organized internet and social media. “Web Squared: Web 2.0 Five Years On” describes the future of:

  • search using speech recognition
  • data subsystems
  • making structured data out of unstructured data
  • Sensor-based applications, such as, voice recognition on mobile devices
  • Photosynth, Gigapixel Photography, and Infinite Images ( synthesize 3D images from crowdsourced photographs)
  • The Rise of Real Time: A Collective Mind – we are moving toward having everything in real time, not just music, videos and books
  • sensor-driven purchasing

However, change is moving so quickly, how many of these predictions will be reality in the next six months. Perhaps what will take 5 years is the integration of the platform, the apps and devices to become pervasive.

And how will all this filter into healthcare. iPhone apps for health care are just beginning to develop. I’m sure that more are on the way. What we need is a follow up article on the vision for Health 2.0 five years on.

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Why Web 2.0 Can Fail?

March 20, 2009

The Krafty Librarian brings up some great points about how enthusiasm for Web 2.0 can lead to its misuse and potential failure. She cites how using the term makes something new and exciting even if it is not the right tool for the situation. Another example is launching a tool just because it is Web 2.0 but without a specific purpose, such as, creating a wiki without a specific goal for the stakeholders or having few interested in adopting the tool. In IT we often refer to this as a solution looking for a problem rather than identifying a problem and the looking for the appropriate technology to solve it.

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Web 2.0 Magazine

March 19, 2009

Came across a new online magazine and toolbox – the Web 2.0 Magazine. Lots of blog postings on a variety of topics but lacking dates. Its toolbox includes a small catalog of web 2.0 tools and hopefully will grow with tools and reviews. Industry events includes several related to cloud computing, such as Private Clouds.

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Tim O’Reilly’s View on Emerging Technology

March 10, 2009

From a blog on the UK Guardian, a report from the Emerging Tech conference includes Tim O’Reilly’s world view and how much of Web 2.0 is getting it wrong.  He recommends:

  1. Work on something that matters to you more than money.
  2. Think about how to create more value than you capture
  3. Build a simple system – let it evolve.
  4. Be friendly to those who extend you.

Great advice and fits well with a healthcare approach to Web 2.0/Health 2.0.

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Closer to the End of Print Media

March 3, 2009

In a post on RxInformatics, an article on the printing costs of the NY Times is cited. Basically, it costs more to print the NY Times than to give its subscribers each a $350 Kindle. Even with this price tag, a brand new device for delivering the news costs less than the paper and print for news. Personally, I would be glad to have an Amazon Kindle. This would be a mega-deal for both parties involved. Some might think that not all subscribers would accept the Kindle but I think adoption would be quick and likely outpace Amazon’s ability to produce and deliver.

What are the implications  for health and medical publishing – offer an ebook to all medical students? Phase out medical publishing which is largely electronic already?

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Web 2.0 and Health 2.0 links found today

November 24, 2008

I came across several resources today in no particular order:

  1. New York Times Magazine on Visual Literacy lead me to Wikipedia on the topic
  2. Many Eyes – a visualization site from IBM
  3. Guy Kawasaki’s website with his books and presentations on start ups
  4. Health 2.0 from a diabetic’s perspective on year later
  5. TwitterEarth
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Beyond Health 2.0 Hype – How Clinicians Find Value

October 10, 2008

There are many Web 2.0 applications but a few which can benefit physicians directly are:

  1. RSS feeds from their favorite medical journals or news sources. The ability to scan many article titles quickly for those of interest can help them sort through medical information overload. Using an RSS feed from a Medline search is another way to bring in the latest publications on specific topics of interest.
  2. Social networking among physicians. Within3.com has the best product, I think. They have a private network with private or public groups which allow discussion and profiles for physicians and other healthcare professionals using real names instead of screen names. And they don’t sell their information. Can be used for case consultation or to get introduced to other physicians who may help with a difficult diagnosis or treatment.
  3. Google Maps and other mashups. Can be specifically to map disease outbreaks.

This are just a few places clinicians can start. More to follow.

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